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United States' Premier Jumpers and Throwers Prepare to Compete At Stanford
Courtesy: Stanford Athletics  
Release: 06/20/2002

June 20, 2002

Stanford, Calif. - The top men's and women's jumpers and throwers in the United States, including World record holder Stacy Dragila in the pole vault and three-time world champion John Godina in the shot put will compete at Stanford's Cobb Track and Angell Field at the USA Track and Field Championships on June 21-23. In addition, world ranked track and field athletes such as Adam Nelson, Savante Stringfellow, Miguel Pate, Jeff Hartwig, Charles Clinger, Suzy Powell, and Amy Acuff will compete for national title crowns and prize money totaling more than $450,000. The winner of each event will earn a spot on Team USA that will compete in the IAAF World Cup Track and Field Championships in Madrid, Spain in September.

Tickets can be purchased at the Stanford Athletics ticket office located at Gate 1 of Stanford Stadium or by calling 1-800-STANFORD. Tickets also will be sold the day of the event. A capacity crowd is expected so fans are encouraged to purchase tickets early. For a complete schedule of events and additional information, please visit the USA Track and Field Championship website at www.ustfnationals.org

Women's Pole Vault (Finals: Sunday June 23; 12:15 p.m.)
Stacy Dragila is undefeated at Cobb Track and Angell Field and in 2001 she set a World record in the women's pole vault at Stanford with a mark of 15-9 1/4. Dragila, who won the Olympic gold medal in 2000, is a two-time World champion and five-time U.S. champion in the pole vault. Dragila has the top vault in the U.S. this season at 15-5 3/4 and is a threat to break her own World record every time she's on the runway. Mary Sauer is ranked fourth in the world in 2002 with a best of 15-1 1/2. Sauer is the 2002 U.S. Indoor champion. Mel Mueller has the second highest vault in U.S. history at 15-1 3/4. Kelli Suttle was a 2000 Olympian and has a best of 15-1. Tracy O'Hara of UCLA is the collegiate record holder and the 2002 NCAA champion.

Men's Pole Vault (Finals: Saturday June 22; 6:15 p.m.)
American record holder Jeff Hartwig was ranked #1 in the United States and #2 in the world in 2001. Hartwig, who is also the American indoor record holder, has a career best of 19-9 1/4. Since 1998, Hartwig has not been ranked lower than second in the world. Lawrence Johnson will be aiming for his third consecutive U.S. Championship title and fifth overall. Johnson was the silver medalist at the 2000 Olympic Games and has the second highest vault in U.S. history at 19-7 1/2. Nick Hysong has a career best of 19-4 1/4, the sixth highest vault all-time by an American. Hysong won the gold medal at the Sydney Olympics and was ranked #1 in the world in 2000. Tye Harvey has cleared 19-5 1/2 indoors and was ranked seventh in the world last season. Tim Mack is the reigning U.S. Indoor champion in the pole vault. Stanford graduate Toby Stevenson has the second highest vault by an American this year.

Women's Long Jump (Finals: Friday June 21; 5:15 p.m.)
Cal graduate Grace Upshaw is the reigning U.S. Indoor champion in the long jump. Upshaw finished second at the 2001 U.S. Championships with a career best leap of 21-8 3/4. George Mason sophomore Latoya Phillips has the furthest jump in the nation this year at 21-10 3/4.

Men's Long Jump (Finals: Friday June 21; 5:30 p.m.)
Three young and exciting jumpers will take center stage in the men's long jump. Savante Stringfellow leads the world this year with a leap of 27-10 1/4. In the 2001, Stringfellow was the silver medalist in the long jump at the World Championships in Edmonton and the U.S. Outdoor and NCAA champion. Stringfellow was ranked #1 in the U.S. and #2 in the world last year. Miguel Pate won the Oracle U.S. Open at Stanford two weeks ago with the second best leap in the world this year at 27-2. Pate won the 2002 U.S. Indoor championship with a meet record leap of 28-2 1/4. Dwight Phillips finished eight at the 2000 Olympic Games and eighth at the 2001 World Championships. Phillips has a career best of 26-11 3/4. Kevin Dillworth has jumped 28-0 wind-aided this year.

Women's High Jump (Finals: Friday June 21; 6:45 p.m.)
Amy Acuff is a two-time Olympian and a three-time U.S. champion. Acuff was ranked #1 in the United States and #6 in the world in 2001. She has a career best 6-6 3/4. Tisha Waller is a two-time Olympian, three-time U.S. champion, and the American indoor record holder. Waller's best of 6-7 is tops in the field. Waller and Acuff have both jumped 6-4 3/4 this year.

Men's High Jump (Finals: Sunday June 23; 1:00 p.m.)
This unquestionably is the finest group of high jumpers to compete at Stanford. Charles Austin is the reigning American record holder at 7-10 1/2 while Matt Hemingway has scaled 7-9 3/4. Last year's U.S. champion Nathan Leeper has a career best of 7-8 3/4 to his credit. Hemingway currently ranks No. 2 in the U.S. at 7-7 1/4 and ranks as the third-highest American in history. Charles Clinger has the top jump in the U.S. in 2002 and the second best jump in the world at 7-8 1/2. Austin's American record may be in jeopardy here.

Women's Triple Jump (Finals: Saturday June 22; 4:30 p.m.)
Yuliana Perez has the #1 jump in the United States this year at 46-7 1/4. Perez was the 2001 U.S. Championship runner-up. Vanitta Kinard is the 2002 U.S. Indoor champion and has a best of 45-7 1/4. Tiombe Hurd is the defending U.S. champion and jumped 46-6 3/4 in 2001 to finish third at the World Indoor Championships.

Men's Triple Jump (Finals: Saturday June 22; 4:30 p.m.)
At the Mt. SAC Relays in April, Kenta Bell leaped in the record books with the #6 performance all-time in the United States. Bell's jump of 57-10 1/4 is the furthest jump in the world this year. NCAA champion Walter Davis of LSU has a best of 56-10 3/4 and is a clutch performer in championship meets. In 2001, Davis finished fifth at the World Championships and was the #1 ranked triple jumper in the U.S. LeVar Anderson has the third best jump in the U.S. this year at 55-10 1/4 while Tim Rusan has leaped 56-4 wind-aided.

Women's Shot Put (Finals: Friday June 21; 7:00 p.m.)
Terri Steer was ranked #1 in the U.S. in 2001 with a personal best of 63-0 1/4. Steer was a 2000 Olympian and a two-time NCAA champion in the shot put while at SMU. Seilala Sua is the defending U.S. champion in the women's shot put and has a career bets of 58-11 1/2. Kristen Heaston, who is coached by Stanford's Robert Weir, finished third at the 2001 U.S. Championships in Eugene. Heaston has a best of 56-4. Stanford sophomore All-American Jill Camarena finished third at the 2002 NCAA Championships and is ranked in the top-ten in the U.S. this year.

Men's Shot Put (Finals: Saturday June 22; 6:30 p.m.)
U.S. behemoths John Godina, Adam Nelson, and Kevin Toth have the three furthest throws in the world this year. The 6'4" 285 pound Godina is a three time World champion in the shot put and has the third farthest throw in the world this year at 71-10 3/4. Nelson, who stands 6'0" and weighs 255 pounds, was the silver medalist at the 2000 Olympic Games and the 2001 World Championships. Adam Nelson has the top throw in the world this year at 73-10 1/4. Toth, a 320 pound regular on ESPN's World's Strongest Man competitions defeated Godina and Nelson in the shot put at the Prefontaine Classic on May 26 with a career best throw of 72-9 3/4. Godina, Nelson, and Toth have three of the six furthest throws in the shot put in U.S. history. Andy Bloom finished fourth in the shot put at the Sydney Olympics and owns a career best of 71-7 1/4. You will not want to miss this competition!

Women's Discus (Finals: Saturday June 22; 6:30 p.m.)
U.S. Olympian Suzy Powell looks to be the class of this group based on her mammoth American record of 227-10 in March. Powell's American Record throw is the furthest in the world this year. Olympian Aretha Hill is ranked fourth in the world behind Powell with a toss of 213-11. Seilala Sua is ranked third in the U.S. at 206-4. Sua is the defending U.S. champion in the discus and was sixth at the 2001 World Championships. Kris Kuehl finished eighth at last year's World Championships and has a career best of 214-4. These four women have recorded four of the five furthest throws in U.S. history. Sua, Kuehl, Powell and Hill ranked No. 1-4 in the U.S. in 2001, respectively.

Men's Discus (Finals: Sunday June 23; 12:45 p.m.)
John Godina returns in the discus seeking his third U.S. title in the event. Godina has been considered one of the premier combination throwers in the world for the last five years. Godina has the third best throw in the U.S. this year. His career best of 229-4 is the seventh furthest throw in U.S. history. Casey Malone has the best throw in the U.S. this season at 218-5. Adam Setliff is a two-time Olympian in the discus. Setliff finished fifth at the Sydney Olympic Games and has a career best of 227-10, the ninth best throw in U.S. history. Andy Bloom has thrown 221-4 and has been one of America's top four discus throwers for many years.


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